Climate Science Math

I’m not sure how the math works here.

Dutifully reported by the CBC, according to a Canadian report on climate ( Canada’s Changing Climate Report (CCCR)), “Canada is, on average, experiencing warming at twice the rate of the rest of the world, with Northern Canada heating up at almost three times the global average, according to a new government report. ”

Hmm. Okay. But how does that explain this.

If you haven’t taken a look at the link, Natalia Mateo put together a twitter thread that lists countries, regions and geography (e.g. mountains) that are reported to be experiencing rising temperatures at higher than average rates. Twice the average rate is pretty common: Sweden, Russia, the arctic, Norway, South Africa, Tibet, all of Africa, mountains in general, China, Alaska, Japan, Korea, Iceland, Britain, Adirondacks, Spain, Australia, Finland, the Himalayas, and Singapore.

Now, clearly, that’s not the whole world, but it certainly suggests a big chunk of the surface of the earth. So … who is bringing down the average? According to this “science” the rest of the earth is warming at below the average rate, to establish the average. Or perhaps even cooling. After all, we are talking about averages and it has to balance out on the other side.

Taking this information at face value (which would be folly), if all these regions are increasing at a rate greater than everyone else, shouldn’t the reporting actually be that Canada et al are increasing at the average rate. But, of course, that won’t suit the climate alarmist narrative. And I am certain the data is not there to support such a contention.

More cooking the data it looks like. Perhaps that is why temperatures are rising.